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Discussion Starter #1
When I was a history teacher a lot of my students wanted to do coursework on the history of their football club. This was understandable as football dominated their lives. Any teacher knows that it is vital to tap into the interests of the student. If you do this successfully, you can turn the apathetic student into someone who is highly motivated. They can also learn a great deal about political, social and economic history by studying football. It also makes a good local history study, which is now a compulsory aspect of the National Curriculum. So also is the need to do in-depth studies.

Most students use the internet for their research. However, despite the large number of websites on the current activities of football clubs, there is very little on the history of football clubs.

I have therefore decided to create a resource for students to use. It will be an online encyclopaedia that will provide a detailed history of the game.

http://www.spartacus.schoolnet.co.uk/ENCfootball.htm

I plan to provide a detailed history of all the main clubs (up until 1945) with biographies of all the players mentioned in the text. One of the first clubs that I have tackled is Manchester United. I have only gone up until 1918 so far but intend to take it to 1945 over the next few months.

http://www.spartacus.schoolnet.co.uk/FmanchesterU.htm

It includes 30 biographies and is cross-referenced with a whole range of possible topics such as the early history of football,

amateur/professionalism, corruption, transfer system, FA Cup, Football League, football kits, cigarette cards, deaths on the pitch, football regulations, tactics, back footballers, racism, football wages, First World War, international games, trade unionism, goalkeeping, goal scorers, etc.

(1) I am interested in making contact with teachers who wish to use this material in the classroom. It is possible that I might be able to get you some funding for producing teaching materials on Manchester United.

(2) I would like to make contact with relatives of Manchester United players I have already or will write about in the future. In some cases, the players themselves may be still alive.

I can be contacted via the forum or by email: [email protected]
 

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John Simkin said:
When I was a history teacher a lot of my students wanted to do coursework on the history of their football club. This was understandable as football dominated their lives. Any teacher knows that it is vital to tap into the interests of the student. If you do this successfully, you can turn the apathetic student into someone who is highly motivated. They can also learn a great deal about political, social and economic history by studying football. It also makes a good local history study, which is now a compulsory aspect of the National Curriculum. So also is the need to do in-depth studies.

Most students use the internet for their research. However, despite the large number of websites on the current activities of football clubs, there is very little on the history of football clubs.

I have therefore decided to create a resource for students to use. It will be an online encyclopaedia that will provide a detailed history of the game.

http://www.spartacus.schoolnet.co.uk/ENCfootball.htm

I plan to provide a detailed history of all the main clubs (up until 1945) with biographies of all the players mentioned in the text. One of the first clubs that I have tackled is Manchester United. I have only gone up until 1918 so far but intend to take it to 1945 over the next few months.

http://www.spartacus.schoolnet.co.uk/FmanchesterU.htm

It includes 30 biographies and is cross-referenced with a whole range of possible topics such as the early history of football,

amateur/professionalism, corruption, transfer system, FA Cup, Football League, football kits, cigarette cards, deaths on the pitch, football regulations, tactics, back footballers, racism, football wages, First World War, international games, trade unionism, goalkeeping, goal scorers, etc.

(1) I am interested in making contact with teachers who wish to use this material in the classroom. It is possible that I might be able to get you some funding for producing teaching materials on Manchester United.

(2) I would like to make contact with relatives of Manchester United players I have already or will write about in the future. In some cases, the players themselves may be still alive.

I can be contacted via the forum or by email: [email protected]
Hey thats one of the best ideas I've heard for a long time.

For my accountancy degree I had to do a business study of any business we wanted to choose.....naturally I chose Manchester United - just to be different.

I also did one on Ladbrokes too - bit of a sporty gal me ya see.

But I did find it hard to find unusual and interestinmg facts and figures to use in order to make my findings interesting to the readers.

Finding the basic facts is easy but anything beyond that is very hard and with you making such a faciltiy available it would be a massive boost for students choosing to do this.

One niggling doubt exists though........wont it make it just too easy for them - do you think it will stop them doing their own research ?

I dont know because I'm not a teacher - be interested in your thoughts on this tho :)
 

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Discussion Starter #3
carlyluvsunited said:
Hey thats one of the best ideas I've heard for a long time.

One niggling doubt exists though........wont it make it just too easy for them - do you think it will stop them doing their own research ?

I dont know because I'm not a teacher - be interested in your thoughts on this tho :)
The problem is that at the moment they find it very difficult to do there own research. Most of the Premier League teams have a section on the history of the club. However, they are not very detailed, nor are they linked to other aspects of the history of football. For example, the early history of football, amateur/professionalism, corruption, transfer system, FA Cup, Football League, football kits, cigarette cards, deaths on the pitch, football regulations, tactics, back footballers, racism, football wages, First World War, international games, trade unionism, goalkeeping, goal scorers, etc.
 

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one thing that should be taken from this is Manchester United have had a long standing feud with the FA a lot of disagreements, if you look back over Manchester Uniteds history and its littered with disputes with the FA more so than any other club.
 

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RedArmy said:
one thing that should be taken from this is Manchester United have had a long standing feud with the FA a lot of disagreements, if you look back over Manchester Uniteds history and its littered with disputes with the FA more so than any other club.
because the FA do not like any organistation bigger than they are - its a ego thing.
 

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Red Devil said:
because the FA do not like any organistation bigger than they are - its a ego thing.
Mr Busby started it......

He said "Excuse me FA people but I'm off into Europe to mess with the best OK....back soon"

And the FA said "No you cant.......we dont want that to happen so come back"

And Mr Busby said "Kiss my ass"

.........and so it was.........English clubs began to compete in Europe !!!

Thanks to Sir Matt standing up to these people.........
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I have started producing teaching materials to go with my Football Encyclopaedia:

http://www.spartacus.schoolnet.co.uk/ENCfootball.htm

The first lesson is for primary school children. It includes questions on early photographs of Manchester United. I have tried them out on my 7 year old grandson. I would be grateful if anyone could try them out on their children. I will then use the feedback to improve the materials.

http://www.spartacus.schoolnet.co.uk/1Fkits.htm

I have included an answer page here:

http://www.spartacus.schoolnet.co.uk/1FkitsA.htm
 

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Discussion Starter #12
One possible school project could be a study of Manchester United and the First World War. This could be looked at in combination with one of the largest football scandals in its history.

http://www.spartacus.schoolnet.co.uk/FmanchesterU.htm

In the 1914-15 season Manchester United finished in 18th place, just one point above relegated Chelsea. The team owed its survival to a 2-0 victory over Liverpool on 2nd April, 1915. Afterwards, bookmakers claimed that they had taken a great deal of money on the 7-1 odds offered on a 2-0 United victory. They suspected that the game had been fixed and pointed out that late in the game, the Liverpool player, Jackie Sheldon, missed a penalty. The bookmakers decided not to pay out on the result and offered a £50 reward for information that would unmask the conspirators.

The Sporting Chronicle newspaper took up the story and claimed that they discovered evidence that players on both sides had got together to concoct a 2-0 scoreline. The newspaper also argued that some of the players had large bets on the result.

The Football League announced it would carry out its own investigation into the case. It published its report in December 1915. It concluded that "a considerable amount of money changed hands by betting on the match and... some of the players profited thereby." Three players in the Manchester United squad were banned for life: Enoch West, Sandy Turnbull and Arthur Whalley. Only West actually played in the game. The same sentence was imposed on four Liverpool players: Jackie Sheldon, Tom Fairfoul, Tommy Miller and Bob Pursell. An eighth player, Laurence Cook, who played for Stockport County, was also convicted of being a member of the betting ring.

It was suggested that if the men joined the armed forces their punishment would be rescinded. Enoch West, who protested his innocence, refused. After the war Arthur Whalley, Jackie Sheldon, Tom Fairfoul, Tommy Miller and Bob Pursell were allowed to play football in the Football League. The exception was Sandy Turnbull who had been killed on the Western Front in 1917. Whalley was seriously wounded at Passchendale but recovered to play in 23 games in the 1919-20 season.

Sandy Turnbull, along with Edwin Latheron of Blackburn Rovers, were probably the best two players to be killed on active service during the First World War.
http://www.spartacus.schoolnet.co.uk/Flatherston.htm
http://www.spartacus.schoolnet.co.uk/MANUturnbull.htm


Two more Manchester United's players were killed during the First World War. Oscar Linkson, who played right-back for the club joined the Middlesex Regiment and was killed during the Somme Offensive on 8th August 1916. Patrick McGuire, an amateur reserve player, also died on active service in 1916.

http://www.spartacus.schoolnet.co.uk/FWWfootball.htm
 
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